A pair of Vietnamese trường đao | Peter Dekker's Mandarin Mansion: Antique Arms & Armor

A pair of Vietnamese trường đao

Large sword
Overall length: 95.7 cm / 37.7 inch
Blade length: 62 cm / 24.4 inch
Thickness: forte 5 mm, middle 4 mm, widest part 3 mm
Blade width: forte 38 mm, widest 93 mm
Weight without scabbard: 1066 grams


Shorter sword
Overall length: 77 cm / 30.3 inch
Blade length: 47.2 cm / 18.6 inch
Thickness: forte 5 mm, middle 3 mm, widest part 1.5 mm
Blade width: forte 32.5 mm, widest 78 mm
Weight without scabbard: 585 grams





DESCRIPTION
A matching pair of Vietnamese trường đao, the equivalent of the Chinese dadao (大刀). The Vietnamese variety of this weapon is characterized by often a more dramatic form compared to its Chinese counterparts, with often rather small guards, and a grip wrap that is done with round cord or rattan instead of the thicker flat braid or round cord more common on Chinese dadao. They are generally of a more flowing design than the Chinese, going from narrower at the base to wider at the tip. Also, like these, they often come with blades engraved with floral motifs.

This is an interesting matching set of two trường đao consisting of a large and heavy and a somewhat smaller, lighter example. Their difference in size aside, they are nearly identical in style and workmanship with the larger one having a slightly more pointed spike on the back. The blades are well-made and in very good condition. Some forging flaws, as typical in this type of weapon, but all far from the blade's edge and none of any consequence to the structural integrity. The larger of the two has a very small nick, otherwise the contours of both weapons are nice and even without any notable disturbances.

The dramatic, almost exaggerated shape of đao truòng and most notably the accelerated curve of the spine and the hollow contour from point to spike are something you also see depicted on earlier Chinese woodblocks. This gives rise to the idea that the style might have been a popular form of the weapon in earlier times, that survived only in Vietnam.

€ 500,- for the pair.

I will not sell them separately, as I feel a matching pair like this should be kept together.

Interested? Questions?
Contact peter@mandarinmansion.com